Screw this Calif. bullet train. Building prisons to relieve overcrowding will create jobs, too. Except this is California.

In the news, a judge refuses to delay the California Browndoggle that would plow through their farms in central California:

20130405-111425.jpgThe long-shot request was filed by Madera County and local farmers who did not want the first 29-mile stretch of the high-speed railway to come through their Central California properties. Many of them showed up alongside several reporters from around the state to witness the courtroom drama.

The Madera opponents argued the state did not adequately plan for the project under California environmental law and asked Frawley to issue an injunction to stop all planning. The state conceded the delay would have pushed back a groundbreaking scheduled for as soon as July. And it might have put the entire bullet train in jeopardy because $3 billion in federal funding to start construction is tied to a deadline.

The Madera opponents argued the state did not adequately plan for the project under California environmental law and asked Frawley to issue an injunction to stop all planning. The state conceded the delay would have pushed back a groundbreaking scheduled for as soon as July. And it might have put the entire bullet train in jeopardy because $3 billion in federal funding to start construction is tied to a deadline.

While unions and other leftist organizations grasp desperately to the concept the train scam will create jobs, another idea that would both create jobs and relieve prison overcrowding gets ignored: build more damn prisons.

Well, ever the leader in tech concepts, California would like to apply those concepts to our prison system, create an “online prison system.”

WHAT???

California Governor Jerry Brown today announced a major reform plan for the state’s corrections system. “An online prison system,” he explained, “will save the state billions and reduce recidivism.”

Under the program, called Massive Open Online Prisons (or MOOPs), incarcerated Californians will be imprisoned from the comfort of their own homes. They will log on every hour to check in with state corrections and enjoy one hour each day to walk around their own yards. Ankle bracelets will ensure that they do not stray beyond 30 yards of their houses or apartments.

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According to MOOP developer Peter Miller, formerly a professor of information technology at the University of Pittsburgh:

Brick-and-mortar prisons are unlikely to keep up with California’s corrections needs: the world would have to construct more than four new 40,000-person prisons per week to accommodate the children who will reach criminal maturity age by 2025.
Prisons are also under tremendous financial pressure, especially in the United States, where rocketing costs have resulted in a backlash from politicians, reform advocates and the incarcerated demanding to know what their money is going towards.

Pay no attention to those who would say the “prisoners” would simply cut the GPS trackers off and…wait WHAT??

“We have a spiking of dangerous inmates who are cutting off their bracelets and not being monitored,” said State Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance).

Felons like Hubert Jayvon Hunter, who cut his GPS bracelet in 2007 and vanished.

Court records show Hunter was convicted of murder when he was 18 years old. He served time, and was later released from prison and put on parole.

Ten years later, he raped a 16-year-old girl in Mission Bay. After that prison sentence, he was paroled and given a GPS device.

So, yeah. Contemplating headdesk. My desk at the moment is my iPad, so I could just hit myself in the head. I guess…

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About Erick Brockway

Living in Camarillo, CA, about 45 miles North of LA. I have a son, and two daughters. Working two jobs (welcome to California life), plus a (now retired) reservist in the US Navy Seabees so life is busy!
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